New (to me) 2007 Interceptor non-ABS

Discussion in 'New Riders' started by Mike Cronis, Dec 18, 2018.

  1. Mike Cronis

    Mike Cronis New Member

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    Owned a 2005 Superhawk and several Ninjas over the years. Currently selling my 2018 Ninja 400 ABS.

    My Candy-red Interceptor has 7000 miles on the clock (soon to get that tasty 8000 mile intermediate checkup). On my test ride, I found the windscreen to be unsatisfactory, plus I'm a short rider (getting Soupy's lowering links and kickstand installed at the dealership) along with the bulbs replaced with PIAA HyperWhites. I considered cutting the suspension linkage but Soupy's is top-notch. I'll likely lose a little turn-in but will gain stability (and flat-footed confidence).

    I found the 2014-2015 Interceptors were more "perched" (though had more goodies, especially with the DLX model) but having a 2018 Ninja those LED headlights are not for me. Both models are a tad top-heavy (the gen 6 and 8s) but that gen-6 ride was smoother than I expected. Feels a lot like a Superhawk VTR 1000 (996) to the point it's uncanny. I think it might even be the same frame structure. I should have never sold my 'Hawk.

    Anyway, anything I should look out for? I noticed the high-beam switch was a little flake-y (might be dirty). Otherwise super clean. Paid $3000.
     
  2. OOTV

    OOTV Member

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    The regulator/rectifier and Stator are two things known to have issues, may want to look at the wiring harness while you’re at it. Lots of post of melted connectors and overheated wires, especially the ones that connect the two fore mentioned items. I usually do a flush/fill on all the fluids, particularly the clutch/brake fluid, this area is often neglected and if left unchanged for a long time, can turn to sludge.

    Oh yeah, Welcome to the World!
     
  3. RllwJoe

    RllwJoe Member

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    Hey Mike, good to have you a part of the best forum on the web! Post up a photo or two when you get a chance.
     
  4. RRloves2RRIDE

    RRloves2RRIDE New Member

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    Your previous moto experience sounds like it serves you well. My 2007 ABS is only my second moto. Learning curve will be fun but also dealing with older hidden parts to be changed out and or cleaned...from sprockets to electrical connections...and for the Bay Area, it will get a couple of LED strips inside that nice deep front fairing well. To see and be seen! I am only 5 ft 6 and thought vfr was too tall, but I got used to it quickly. Ride safe. Congrats :)
     
  5. Mike Cronis

    Mike Cronis New Member

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    Nice, guys! Yeah, the Superhawk 996 also had 'stator issues. I'm familiar with that one! Fluid changes, yep. Seems the brake fluid was already changed based on that color I see. I only rode it for about 3 miles and was completely satisfied. Getting a few things added as I had said. I'll probably get the bike in a few weeks. It was up in Fort Collins and I'm down here in Fountain (about 150 miles south) with a few mountain passes (sandy) in-between on I-25 so they're shipping it to me after the work is done. I'll check that clutch fluid but if I remember, it was nearly clear with a slight hint of "tea" honey color. ;)

    Bikes I've owned in order since 1988:

    1972 Honda 450CB
    1972 Honda 450CB (again, 5 years later)
    Finally took the MSF course (what a dork I was)
    1997 Suzuki Katana 600 (Californian edition w/oil-cooler fan)
    2001 Ninja 250R-H
    2003 Ninja 500R (terrible bike, actually. Slipped-out a lot, never laid it down)
    2004 Ninja 250R-H (again, missed my old one)
    2005 Honda Superhawk 996
    2008 Ninja 250R-J (breaking these in by-manual is a PITA) Still riding the Superhawk
    2013 Can-Am Spyder RS-S (sold the Superhawk and Ninja to go trike)
    2012 Honda CBR 600RR ABS (trikes suck) sold after 2 years.. twitchy but a good bike
    2018 Ninja 400 ABS (ooo, shiny) Selling on the Ninja 400 forum and Cycletrader (seat position is bad for long-distances for me)
    2007 Honda Interceptor VFR 800 (non-ABS)

    Of all the bikes I've owned new, I've broken them in per-manual and did my own oil changes (easy). Superhawk and 600RR were lowered by cutting the suspension linkage. The 250's were lowered and highly modified with Yoshimura parts and lowering-links, etc. Quite fun little bikes, really.

    I'd say Honda can't be beat on non-false-neutrals and pure-balance and predictability. The Gen-6 Interceptor felt just like my beloved Superhawk (my best bike) and I couldn't resist.
     
  6. 34468 Randy

    34468 Randy Secret Insider

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    Welcome to the World of great two wheelers and occasional insanity. Sounds like you got a pretty nice deal on a bike with that kind of mileage. I am considering selling mine and getting a new(er) 8th gen, and I was going to list mine at 2000 CDN paseos. A starting point to be sure. It is an 06 with 217,000 km on it. Or 135,200 miles. I really have no idea what the bike is worth though so it remains to be seen what I will get for it.

    Like previously posted, we need pix to verify you have gotten your ride.
     
  7. duccmann

    duccmann Insider

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    [​IMG]
    Welcome and enjoy.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  8. skimad4x4

    skimad4x4 "Official" VFRWorld Greeter

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    Hi Mike and welcome to the Madhouse :Welcome:

    Congratulations on choosing the fastest colour VFR! :potstirrer1:

    As others have said - we like photos on here - so once you collect the bike, please come back here and click "Image" icon and then follow the prompts to locate and upload a photo or two of your VFR from your computer.


    As you have yet to really get to grips with the bike, I suggest you give it a few days before making any material alterations - some things may grow on you whilst other more significant issues may only become apparent once you have taken the bike out for a few long rides.

    Obviously if the bike seems too tall, you might consider lowering the forks a bit through the triple tree - its a free adjustment. Just don't go mad and ideally match the drop at the front by adjusting the rear suspension to lower the rear. Genuine Soupy adjustable drop-links will work, but be careful - a long while back a member on here ended up with her VFR blocking a freeway after a "look-alike" adjustable link sheared collapsing the rear of the bike onto the back tyre which at motorway speeds was totally shredded by the time she came to rest, and was very lucky to walk away unharmed.

    One downside of a lowered bike is you will usually find using the main stand more challenging. So if you do lower the bike, it may be worth getting assistance when first using the centre stand. These things are a bit top heavy, and it does not take much to get past the point of no return where your best plan is to get out of the way rather than try and save it wrecking your back or have it land on top of you. Aftermarket tip over protection from firms like R&G can be a worthwhile investment.

    If you find the bar position puts too much weight on your wrists then consider fitting Helibars, rather than basic risers. They move the bars upwards and nearer to you which will allow a more upright riding position which will significantly reduce the load on your wrists.

    Take Care & ATGATT


    SkiMad
     
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