Chain Adjusting Tool

Discussion in 'Mechanics Garage' started by 34468 Randy, Nov 11, 2021.

  1. raYzerman

    raYzerman Member

    Country:
    Canada
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2019
    Messages:
    985
    Likes Received:
    330
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Millgrove, ON
    Map
    I have much experience with woodworking tools...... as Norm Abram said on New Yankee Workshop, 'never can have too many routers". I have 5.
    You may be familiar with LeeValley Tools..... spendy good shit. Local store is 10km from here.
     
  2. NorcalBoy

    NorcalBoy Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2007
    Messages:
    5,825
    Likes Received:
    751
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Desert Southwest
    Map
    I would say buy it, then ask tool people to tell you what it does.
     
  3. 34468 Randy

    34468 Randy Secret Insider

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Messages:
    13,545
    Likes Received:
    1,435
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Location:
    Chilliwack, BC Canada
    Map
    Lee Valley is in Vancouver so a bit of a drive for me. But yes, they have quality hand tools. Not much for the bigger stuff or power tools. At least last time I was there. A good source for things like hinges, handles and slides and the such. Nice quality brass stuff from the UK.

    I worked for KMS Tools for a while when they first opened up in Chilliwack. They are a huge tool store out west and are expanding. Carrying the big name power tools. I spent most of my pay cheque on tools. Thought I had all I needed before but found out not all I wanted.

    Routers. Yes. A of about a year ago, I was up to five and make use of them all. I have a very old and quite small Black and Decker that I just love. Very easy to handle but it is only a 1/4 inch shank. Once I replaced that damned plastic covered chord with a good rubber covered chord, that thing was so easy to work with.

    KMS bought the rights to General Tool when the owning family decided to retire. General was a very good quality tool. KMS actually wrestled the rights away from the Chinese who were failing to maintain the quality of General Tool, where KMS maintained or upgraded the quality if need be. The renamed the tools Magnum. I bought their thickness planner with the helical head in it. I just love that machine. Planes really nice and is far quieter that the planners with two or three blades. This one has 26 blades that have three edges sharp. The blades can be rotated when they get dull Great planner.
     
    raYzerman likes this.
  4. mello dude

    mello dude Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2006
    Messages:
    3,935
    Likes Received:
    261
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Southwest Ohio
    Map
    What would you suggest to get started with a table saw? Mbe a planner?
     
  5. 34468 Randy

    34468 Randy Secret Insider

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Messages:
    13,545
    Likes Received:
    1,435
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Location:
    Chilliwack, BC Canada
    Map
    Are you about to take up woodworking? The basic few tools for all around woodworking projects are a table saw, compound mitre saw and a good 1/4 - 1/2 inch collet router. You can do a lot with that. And good clamps. You will never have enough clamps. I have about 50 or so and that is not enough. Pipe clamps are great because they are using basic electrical or gas metal piping. If you thread both ends, you can then double them up of a longer clamp with readily available pipe connectors. A planer is nice but that can come later unless you find you need it. I would get a jointer, 6" minimum, before a planer though. You can plane wood to thickness you want on a jointer but you can't use a planer as a jointer. I use a jointer quite extensively.

    But I would need to know what kind of projects you are likely to be doing before I can make more recommendations. Of course you already have things like hammers, drills impact driver and a hand saw. There are a variety of cheap hand saws that really come in handy such as trim saw, and Japanese pull saws. The pull saw is nice for making very fine cuts. They saw on the pull stroke as opposed to the push on most hand saws

    I could go on and on and on with this.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2021
  6. mello dude

    mello dude Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2006
    Messages:
    3,935
    Likes Received:
    261
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Southwest Ohio
    Map
    Hey Randy, I have built a handful of wood contraptions, including a monster wood bench. I like that something from my brain comes together out of thin air, and becomes useful. Been watching YT videos on wood working, and kicking around getting deeper into it.
    Also looking at putting up a dedicated space for it. (Sawdust and motorcycles don't mix)
     
  7. 34468 Randy

    34468 Randy Secret Insider

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Messages:
    13,545
    Likes Received:
    1,435
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Location:
    Chilliwack, BC Canada
    Map
    Ya. Sawdust and bikes under repair don't mix well. I usually push my bike out into the driveway when I am making serious dust. I keep thinking of getting a dust collection system but I simply do not have the wall space to park it. I so much wanted to take wood shops but that never happened. I took metal shops, plastics, drafting, photography, electrical (2 hours a day for three years so I was an apprentice at one time) and a couple others I can't think of off hand, but no wood shops. SO I am self taught.

    It all started with my wife wanting a book shelf and her showing me one at the furniture store. I told her to give me that money and I will build one finished far better than that one for less money. And I did. With a 1976 vintage black and decker circular saw with a bent plate, and a B&D router, which I still have. Then I bought a couple pipe clamps and away I went. We still have that book shelf. That was back around about 1991 or so. Now I have a double garage stacked full of tools and wishing I had more room for more.

    Be careful. It will grab you by the balls and won't let up. Gawd, I loved working at that tool store. Should never have left there. If I were still working there, I would probably buy myself a Sawstop cabinet saw. That is one of those saws that will slam shut if you touch the spinning blade. But they are expensive. Here is an 8 minute video on these saws. A little long but there is not any self rewarding bull shit talking, just information, on how the Sawstop works. Designed by a doctor of all people.

    How Safe is a Sawstop Saw? - Never Before Seen 19,000 FPS HD Slow-Mo Video - YouTube

    He went on to say the table saw is the source of the most injuries and the most severe injuries in a wood shop. I believe that. But the router and especially a router table, can be very dangerous. The way the bit on a router table spins, it tends to grab your fingers if they are too close, and will pull them into the bit. A jointer will do that too. But so long as you are aware of that and take the appropriate precautions, all's good.
     
    mello dude likes this.
  8. linkken

    linkken New Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2021
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Fortine, MT
    Map
    I need a bigger toolbox!

    And a bigger shop!! ...

    ...and garage space!!!
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2021
  9. 34468 Randy

    34468 Randy Secret Insider

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Messages:
    13,545
    Likes Received:
    1,435
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Location:
    Chilliwack, BC Canada
    Map
    And a psychologist
     
    mello dude likes this.
  10. linkken

    linkken New Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2021
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Fortine, MT
    Map
    that just goes without saying!
     
    mello dude likes this.
Related Topics

Share This Page