Brake Fluid and Coolant Questions

Discussion in 'Mechanics Garage' started by Vulcanator, Feb 27, 2018.

  1. Vulcanator

    Vulcanator New Member

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    I need to replace the brake fluid and coolant in my 2014 VFR. What is your preferred brake fluid? For coolant can you use the same stuff as your car? For example can I use the Honda Type II coolant that I put in my Civic?
     
  2. fink

    fink Member

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    As long as it’s suitable for alloy/ magnesium engines and doesn’t contain silicates. Dot 4 brake fluid will be fine.
     
  3. DaHose

    DaHose New Member

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    I'm with fink. Any decent DOT 4 works.

    For coolant, it pretty much doesn't matter. As I understand it, there are basically three places in the world that make the glycol everyone uses, so the only real difference is the additives. The current flavor of your favorite parts store brand would be fine to use. Just avoid mixing brands. You can end up with a concoction of additives that might not play nice together.

    Jose
     
  4. Vulcanator

    Vulcanator New Member

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    Thanks for the advice. After doing some research it appears I'll be good to go using the Type II my Civic uses as it has the same properties as Honda's motorcycle coolant.
     
  5. scottbott

    scottbott Insider

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    I have 25 litres of the Pink stuff for VW's so I will use that whenever it is due to be replaced, it was on special and my VW camper needs loads of it
     
  6. Laker

    Laker New Member

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    Get a Speedbleeder kit for quick brake fluid change
     
  7. mello dude

    mello dude Member

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  8. Bubba Utah

    Bubba Utah Member

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    I have never changed my brake fluid. Reason, I have never owned a bike with more the 24,000 miles. I may have missed something since I do have a 2014 and now 4 yrs old but ridden only 5,800 miles. Chime in please all about the intervals on this. I am thinking of changing to braided brake lines. Chime in as well on this. Thanks guys and gals ( Never forget about A.M.)
     
  9. ducnut

    ducnut New Member

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    Brake fluid is hygroscopic, so it absorbs moisture. Not only does water settle to the calipers and rust the pistons and sleeves, it boils and causes brake fade.

    Every 2yrs is fairly standard practice.

    I’ve settled on Motorex. I’ve tried a lot of stuff over the years, on the road and track, and it seems to be very stable and doesn’t absorb moisture at a stupid rate like Motul RBF600.

    I just got Galfer lines for my 5th Gen, but, haven’t gotten them installed, yet. I have their lines on my SV, as well.
     
  10. mello dude

    mello dude Member

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    If your brake fluid looks like coffee, prolly time to do it.
     
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  11. Bubba Utah

    Bubba Utah Member

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    Thanks, You had a SV as well? Damn I miss that Sv1000s! Oh well, Thanks again! Looks like I have a new project in a few weeks.
     
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  12. irishrOy

    irishrOy New Member

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    I prefer Prestone coolant! Just be sure to take the one that says "AF2100-something-something" in the bottom left corner, that's the silicate free one! :D
    They make a silicate-free coolant that can be added and mixed with any other brand, no problems whatsoever! :)

    It looks like this:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2018
  13. Vulcanator

    Vulcanator New Member

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    Brake fluid and coolant have been replaced. Used the Honda DOT4, and the Honda Type II that I put in my car. The drain plug on the cylinder is a pain to get to. I just drained at the water pump, refilled, then ran the engine, and re-drained and filled. Ops check good. :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2018
  14. irishrOy

    irishrOy New Member

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    Tell me about it, man :D
    (Assuming the Vtec's and '14+ Viffers have retained roughly the same engine-layout, that is)

    Next time I think I'll do it just like you and get some more coolant and destilled water for the "cleaning out run" and spare myself the "fiddling around in tight spaces"-experience.
     
  15. Vulcanator

    Vulcanator New Member

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    I like the fact that when I read my Honda service manual it simply tells you to remove the drain plug. The diagram appears to show this to be the most simple task. Oh no, the leads for the starter motor, and oil filter, and the radiator and frame make getting a wrench on it impossible unless you start dismantling extra parts - not for me.
     
  16. irishrOy

    irishrOy New Member

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    exactly!

    Yeah, that may be an easy task for a mechanic who's getting paid by the hour and has no problems dismantling all that stuff.

    But we as "private" persons? Hell naw.
     
  17. DaHose

    DaHose New Member

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    With the fairing off, I was able to get the drain plug out of the pump housing just fine. What I was not ready for, was the rather powerful stream of coolant shooting out of the darned thing. I put the plug right back in, cleaned up my mess, then pulled the plug with a towel in the way to catch the coolant and drop it into the bucket. Sooo....... make sure you are ready to stop the coolant from spraying all over.

    Jose
     
  18. EchoWars

    EchoWars New Member

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    Just to add my $0.02. Been working on aluminum water-cooled engines since the mid 70's, and coolant technology has advanced well beyond the 'greenie' stuff, especially if we're discussing aluminum/magnesium engine parts. All I use nowadays is the Valvoline/Zerex Asian Vehicle stuff: Link. Another Link. Sorta reddish pink, and has kept my '89 Prelude and '91 CBR cooling system looking like it left the factory last week.

    Always buy the 50/50 mix, especially with aluminum engines. The water they use is de-mineralized and deionized and 100x better than anything you can buy (including grocery store distilled water) short of a chemical supply store.

    Edit: I know a lot of guys use Honda Type 2 blue stuff, and I suppose that's OK, but:
    1. It is MUCH more expensive.
    2. And though they do state that it is non-silicate and non-borate, they do not mention whether they are using a PHOAT (phosphate Hybrid Organic Acid Technology) formulation. Maybe, maybe not. Honda's pretty closed-mouthed when it comes to describing why you're paying three time more than what you can pick up at Walmart. I've been using the Valvoline/Zerex stuff for many years and it has worked marvelously.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2018
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