What are these hoses? Dropped bike, 6th gen

Discussion in 'Mechanics Garage' started by CunFuse, May 13, 2022.

  1. CunFuse

    CunFuse New Member

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    Hello, I'm a new rider, got this nice VFR800 VTEC.
    The other day I dropped the bike, while standing still, trying to turn in an inclined road. Now, maybe because of shame, I kind of left in a hurry. The bike seemed fine, so I left.
    However, before leaving, I noticed a small puddle, of what I believe to be gas, but not sure. I was looking around the bike and noticed this hose, which leaked small amounts of gas? But only when wiggled. It hangs with other hoses, but the other two are dry, only this one has gas smell and wet. I didn't see anything leaking afterwards, oil seems fine, brake fluid reservoirs full.
    I'm not mechanically talented, so I thought I'd ask here, and maybe learn something anyway.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I'm kind of sad today :(, why did I have to drop it like that. Really sad, at least someone helped me pick it up -.-
    Has this happened to you?
    Are there some things I should check after a drop like that?
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2022
  2. Grum

    Grum New Member

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    Sorry to hear of your drop. Most of us will do the same at least once in a lifetime! A foot slipping out on loose gravel when coming to a stop is a common one, also NEVER touch the Front Brake while slow manovering in a turn. With the weight of a 6gen there is a very small lean angle before the point of No Return when stationary!

    The three hoses are - Tank Breather, Tank Filler Overflow, and Coolant Reserve Tank Overflow. You should neatly arrange the hoses so that they are all the same length just below the retaining clamp they fit in under the bike, You can give the clamp a little squeeze so it grips the hoses better (but NOT enough to block them), easy to do.

    With the bike laying on its side there's no doubt a small amount of fuel would enter the breather hose then drain out the exit of the hose. Provided you have no further Fuel leaks, you'll be fine, only your pride that will be damaged, or perhaps a busted mirror and scratched fairings!

    Good Luck for the future, it's a great bike.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2022
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  3. squirrelman

    squirrelman Member

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    probably would have been smarter to spend a year learning and riding a smaller bike, eh ?


    RAEVA MI VERKER !
     
  4. CunFuse

    CunFuse New Member

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    Thank you, I'm trying to learn a little every day. I talked to a friend and he told me it's probably just the breather, I guess that's confirmed.
    My low speed maneuvering really needs practice, I tend to rely on my feet too much. But practicing will probably result in dropping the bike again... but then again, not practicing will also result in drops, maybe practicing is best. :D I should probably get sliders though.

    I don't think a small bike prepares you for this kind of weight at low speeds. It's much better to practice on a heavy bike, but maybe one where dropping it a couple of times won't matter.
     
  5. Captain 80s

    Captain 80s Member

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    I've read this bit of advice from a few different people lately. For a newb I get it a little.

    Proper front brake control and use is a critical skill that is beneficial everywhere. It reminds me of the old crusty Goldwing riders that proclaimed you never use the front brake because, "you'll flip right over!".

    In tight parking lot, steering lock, maneuvers, the front brake is mostly what I'm using. Even in gravel.

    Any riding course, regardless of what terrain you're on, will pound the importance of the front brake. Not just in straight line maximum braking circumstances.

    Even in the Danny Walker Flat Track School I took, the front brake was emphasized and practiced repeatedly. It's the only thing you have in some right hand turns, like a TT course, with your leg hanging out.

    I suppose it illuminates the importance of training in this instance.
     
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  6. Grum

    Grum New Member

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    It does take practice because good slow manoeuvring requires some non instinctive skills, like keeping your head up not looking down, look where you are going, having a visual horizon helps with balance. Keep your feet on the foot pegs the moment you start moving off, it's poor technique having your feet paddling like a penguin.
    Find a vacant parking lot start by doing large figure eights, as your confidence increases very gradually start reducing the size of your eights. Your bike with a warm engine should move you along slowly at idle, feathering the rear brake slightly will help for speed control if needed, make sure there is no tendency for the engine to stall. Beware, a snatch of front brake while the front wheel is sharply turned can throw you to the ground, the laws of physics dictate this. And of course in normal riding your front brake is your life line!

    STRONGLY suggest you go along to any rider training courses run by skilled motorcycle instructors, it will help you immensely with ALL aspects of braking and bike control etc.
    Good Luck, ride safe.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2022
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  7. skimad4x4

    skimad4x4 "Official" VFRWorld Greeter

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    Hi CunFuse and Welcome to the Madhouse:Welcome:

    Others have explained what those pipes do and provided the leak/drip has since stopped, you should be fine to ride on with a few battle scars.

    If nothing else you have now staked your claim for a place in Randy's list of butter finger VFR owners -

    https://vfrworld.com/threads/you-dropped-it-how-many-time.44298/

    As you will see the list is now up to 40 pages - so put it down to experience, and consider some extra training to improve your slow speed riding skills. Send Randy a PM so that your entry will be confirmed.

    You have already learned several of the most important lessons: -

    These bikes are really heavy so put aside pride - ask for help to pick it up.
    These bikes are also relatively top heavy - which is great for dynamic handing at speed - but the resulting instability gets worse when stationary or at slow speeds. Putting you foot down only to find there is a pothole you did not spot or there is an adverse slope and suddenly keeping the bike upright can become a major challenge.

    Once they pass the point of no return - get out the way - trying to stop the bike for hitting the deck will rarely work but can easily result in back injury.
    Fitting sliders is mostly marketed as providing protection for the bike - which is true - but its biggest benefit is it protects you from ending up with your leg potentially being crushed beneath a quarter tonne of motorbike.

    The mirrors are often damaged during a tip over - if so you will find Emgo offer a mirror which is virtually the same as the original but a fraction of the cost of a Honda item - a good tip is to adjust the mirror pivot bolt tension - so that it is just tight enough to keep the mirror where you want it but still loose enough to swing harmlessly out the way during a tip-over.

    Until you get used to your new VFR, take extra care using the main stand - as fuel can suddenly slosh around in the fuel tank changing the balance - whilst heavier/taller riders should have no problem, smaller riders should consider getting help until you are confident using the main stand.

    In the meantime remember ATGATT - take care have fun with your VFR



    SkiMad

    PS Where in Norway are you based? In June next year I will be riding up with group from France to attend the Ulysses-Club Norway meeting in Rysstad.
     
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  8. CunFuse

    CunFuse New Member

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    haha, nice, now I don't feel alone in this. Sent him a message.
    "These bikes are really heavy so put aside pride - ask for help to pick it up." I didn't even have to ask, a nice guy was close and put down his coffee to help. He said he has a similar bike :) VFR's are pretty popular. I've met other people that have vfr1200 and others.
    Do side bags work for protection? I didn't check if my foot would fit, but only one spot at the very front got scratched, other than that it was all on the side bag.

    Thanks for the tips, everyone, appreciated! Stay safe, these are weird times.

    :Boobies1:, why are these breast emojis here, haha. :Boob2: because why not, I guess? also, :Boobies7:
     
  9. CunFuse

    CunFuse New Member

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    Hey, I'm pretty close, around that area actually. This club is only for 40+ people though, maybe in a few years XD
     
  10. Camp

    Camp New Member

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    All he asked was what is this hose. It's a drain, you tip it drains. We ALL have had tips, we deal.
     
  11. Grum

    Grum New Member

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    Jeez mate, that sounds a bit harsh!
    The OP is new to riding, knows nothing about his VFR and is not confident with slow riding. He greatly appreciated the added info a few of us supplied him!
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2022
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