Front tire - reversing rotational direction (anyone with actual experience)

Discussion in 'General VFR Discussions' started by HondaVFR800, Sep 27, 2015.

  1. HondaVFR800

    HondaVFR800 New Member

    Country:
    Australia
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Hi

    I wear the RHS side of my front tires out with about a third of the distance traveled still remaining on the LHS (i ride on the LHS of the road).

    I am about to have to replace the 6th front tire i have used on my VFR800 (48,000 km) and am contemplating reversing the front tire (rotating backwards as per the rotation arrow) so that i get to use up all the LHS of the tire as well.

    I understand the reasons for the tire rotating as per the arrow on the sidewall. The following is (supposedly) from Avon tires and i fully agree with the logic:

    Before we can talk about directional arrows you must first understand a bit about tread patterns. There are many different tread patterns but there is one main reason to have any tread and that is to disperse water. (dust, dirt)

    A tread pattern can be designed to disperse more water by making it rotate in only one direction. Thus, the need for directional arrows. The arrow tells you which way to mount a tire for maximum water dispersal. Another, less apparent reason for directional arrows is the tread splice.

    What is a tread splice? When a tire is manufactured the tread portion of the tire starts out as a long flat strip. This strip is wrapped around the tire and the two ends are cut on an angle so one end overlaps the other rather than having square cut ends.

    This overlapping point or splice offers a bigger surface area to bond together, rather than the small surface area provided by square cut ends. (Imagine gluing your fingertips together, as opposed to gluing along the entire length of your fingers laid on top of each other. Like an angled splice, the overlapping fingers result in a much stronger bond).

    To further ensure the strength of this bond along the tread splice the directional arrow will show you which way to mount the tire so that when the rider is “on the gas”; the acceleration force on the rear tire is pressing the splice together, rather than peeling it back.

    As for braking, 80 % of the braking should take place in the front on most bikes. Therefore, the front tread splice is run in the opposite direction than that of the rear, so when the rider is on the brakes, he’s not peeling the tread splice back.

    If you are using a tire that has a directional arrow for rear rotation only and for some reason you want to put it on the front, make sure it is rotating in the opposite direction so you don’t aggravate the tread


    As well, i am of the opinion that the direction/angle orientation of the edge tread groves, F & R are so they are parallel to the tire slip angle and minimize cupping or scalloping. Slicks with no tread do not cup or scallop.

    I am hoping that someone has actually run a front tire in reverse rotation and can provide some comment as to whether they had any issues, mainly in regard to "peeling the tread splice back". I am not a hard front wheel/tire breaker (though i do a fair bit of moderate trail braking) so i don't think i will stress the tire splice too much.

    I look forward to hearing about your experiences, if any.

    thanks
     
  2. 34468 Randy

    34468 Randy Secret Insider

    Country:
    Canada
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Messages:
    13,673
    Likes Received:
    1,527
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Location:
    Chilliwack, BC Canada
    Map
    6 front tires in 48,000 km? That is one hell of a lot of tires to go through. Until now, I have replaced my fronts each time I replace my rears. Just because. The front has always had usable tread left on it. I am about to put on my 7th set. I have 195,000 km on mine. I can't answer your question but have to say, there is something wrong if you are going through that many front tires.
     
  3. NormK

    NormK New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2012
    Messages:
    1,821
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I got 45,000ks out of the front tire on my CB750, can't see me ever wearing the new one out, maybe I'm just a soft rider
     
  4. Allyance

    Allyance Insider

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2013
    Messages:
    3,510
    Likes Received:
    381
    Trophy Points:
    128
    Location:
    East Bay, California
    Map
    I would be very wary of changing the direction of rotation of a tire with lot of miles on it. The internal cords of certain tires become formed by the rotation and will get distorted by the opposite rotation. I had this happen to some car tires given to me without rotation information, and they destroyed themselves.
     
  5. adeyren

    adeyren New Member

    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2014
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Location:
    Worcester UK
    Map
    I would also be very wary in case of insurance reasons. The directional arrow is there for a purpose.
     
  6. FJ12rydertoo

    FJ12rydertoo Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Messages:
    2,219
    Likes Received:
    264
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Platte City, MO
    Map
    That's a joke right? :) 29,000 miles from a tire?
     
  7. Allyance

    Allyance Insider

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2013
    Messages:
    3,510
    Likes Received:
    381
    Trophy Points:
    128
    Location:
    East Bay, California
    Map
    Found this explanation for the difference in wear from one side to the other:
    With this knowledge one can "read" a tire. More accurately, one can learn how the rider brakes and corners. Leaning over will leave a high spot on the outside (away from the center line of the tire) of the tread. Braking will leave a high spot at the rear of the tread, viewed as it touches the ground. If one corners and brakes at the same time, the outside rear will have the high spot.

    From examining the wear pattern one can learn that the rider likes to lean one way more than the other. The rider will also brake harder while leaning one way more than the other. Compare the right side and left side wear. The more worn, the more that the rider is comfortable in that lean. Look at the rear of the tread block and see which side is more worn. That is the side that the rider is more comfortable using the brakes. Almost no rider is symmetrical in riding habits. It is common to find braking wear on one side and cornering wear on the other side. The rider brakes before going into a right hand turn and then goes through. On left hand turns the rider is willing to apply brakes while in the turn. Many combinations are possible.


     
  8. Gator

    Gator Insider

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Messages:
    5,185
    Likes Received:
    804
    Trophy Points:
    143
    Location:
    Boynton Beach, FL
    Map
    I know a lot of guys that run reversed tires at Jennings GP track because its layout tears up lefts at almost 2 times as the right side. . That being said they know which ones can be flipped. As Alliance said some tires cords are made a certain way and will come apart if the stress is high running backwards. I'd just but a tire mate.
     
  9. Grumpy old man

    Grumpy old man New Member

    Country:
    New Zealand
    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2014
    Messages:
    224
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Cambridge, New Zealand
    Map
    That is not a lot of tires really it can get really hot for long periods of the year here in Oz and you have to remember different markets get different tire compounds even though they look the same

    I have destroyed a pilot road 3 front tire in 3500km's and a rear in 2500 km's before away on a fairly hi speed tour of part of the country rider with luggage no pillion and they were at the correct pressure

    Also a lot of our roads are made from loose chip blue rock which is very abrasive compared to asphalt and they place a lot of camber on the roads with a peak towards the road center because of the monsoonal type rain we can get

    Pilot powers and other soft tires will not last very long here in Queensland in the summer if you got 5000km's you would be driving miss daisy
     
  10. NormK

    NormK New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2012
    Messages:
    1,821
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    No joke, I only changed it because I had a bit of an prang and the insurance company wanted to look at it so I thought it best if it had a new tire on it.I must admit that most of those ks were freeway riding. From memory the rear did 30,000+ks. Metzler Marathons, not sure if they make them for the VFR, never looked
     
  11. MichaelD

    MichaelD New Member

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2010
    Messages:
    227
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Location:
    Central Kansas
    Map
    I think reversing direction of your tire will result in unfavorable circumstances. Not a good idea.
     
Related Topics

Share This Page