Dielectric grease question

Discussion in '3rd & 4th Generation 1990-1997' started by bintings, Nov 12, 2015.

  1. bintings

    bintings New Member

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    Howdy folks

    I installed VFRness a couple days back which solved my burnt connections, wires and lack of charge to the battery.
    Corrosion seemed to be the overall cause of my burnt connections so I looked into ways of limiting this for the future, specially as my bike will be left outside for most of winter (UK resident).

    Dielectric grease seemed a good option so I acquired some and dabbed it behind the stator connector plug and the plug that goes into the r/r (where the wires enter and not inside with the pins).

    Later I have read mixed thoughts on the matter: Some say it will trap the heat in the connector and cause a resistance build up while others say they have never had any problems and keeps the moisture out.


    I am now unsure if i should remove the grease or leave it in.

    Thoughts on the matter??
     
  2. CandyRedRC46

    CandyRedRC46 Member

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    Clean it out. Dielectric grease is not an electrical conductor. It adds resistance that creates heat. After dielectric grease cooks in the connections it turns into a corrosive green powder.
     
  3. rjgti

    rjgti New Member

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    leave it, there is NO issue at all with it in connecters
     
  4. CandyRedRC46

    CandyRedRC46 Member

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    Tell that to every connector on my 2007 vfr800 that I put dielectric grease on back in 2010. They have all since burnt up, one by one.

    Sent from my A0001 using Tapatalk
     
  5. rjgti

    rjgti New Member

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  6. Knight

    Knight New Member

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    CR, did you notice that he sealed the connections externally with grease but did not put it on the conductors? Do you have the same opinion?

    Let's see, the grease seals out moist air but that same air provides some cooling. Which effect is more beneficial? I cannot say.

    I would not add dielectric grease to the conductors themselves. However if I am reading this correctly that is a different discussion which crept in here.

    Bintings, whether you do the above or not, I suggest that you inspect and clean the bike's connections and switches as part of your scheduled maintenance. Some manner of corrosion is going to happen no matter what. If you periodically inspect such, you will also catch any heat damage (burnt wiring, melted connectors) before there is a catastrophic failure. Check these high current connections more often, and establish some longer schedule for the bike's switches. And right on, be more diligent the years that the bike is outside, vs. in the garage, vs. in the house.

    If you inspect and clean proactively, you will practically eliminate the chance of a total failure. We can afford to wait for our car's systems to fail as we are pretty protected in the car. We cannot just wait for the bike to fail while we are riding along on the freeway. There is too much at stake.

    RJGTI, looking at the article this is funny as I was just thinking about the differences in cars. That article points out failures in 2011 GMs. 2011? Are you serious? I have a 2000 Celica which has never had even a warning light on. (Oops yes 1 engine light this year but it was valid. I had to replace the MAF and clean out the EGR and such.) But I digress. Yes, the manufacturer with shoddy, poorly designed systems might suggest grease, duct tape, glue, lol, a lot of things. It is astounding that GM has not got this down pat yet.

    If you own a GM you have much bigger problems so I say go ahead and goop it up good. Just coat the whole darn car. It will last longer LOL.
     
  7. rjgti

    rjgti New Member

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    i can bring up tech sheets on uro cars using the same material
     
  8. Knight

    Knight New Member

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    I still won't retract what I said about GM :)
     
  9. NormK

    NormK New Member

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    The simple fix is to piss the connectors off and solder and heatshrink the wires and stop worrying about band aid fixes
     
  10. CandyRedRC46

    CandyRedRC46 Member

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    Haha yeah I had to do that with every burnt up connector that I had put dielectric grease in. Using Dielectric grease was absolutely the worse advise anyone has ever given me. I wouldn't wish that on my worst enemy lol.

    Sent from my A0001 using Tapatalk
     
  11. Outboard John

    Outboard John New Member

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    That read was informative. Broken down to the nitty gritty, use high quality stuff, and use it sparingly. The solder and shrink tube method mentioned by Norm would seem to be the ultimate bullet proofing, but man, there are a butt load of connectors through out the bike!
    Just got my Multistrada back from the shop after it quit on me mid ride two weeks ago. I could smell faint burnt electrical from somewhere on the bike. On the roadside I pulled every fuse (and that bike has a bunch!) all good, and arced the battery (plenty of sparks, ha ha), after the tow truck ride home I checked the r/r and tested the battery, all fine. So that's when I new it was above my pay grade and trailered it to the shop. 2.5 hours of labor later, a $6 relay and a salvaged plug connector and the Multi is back home with me (and the VFr), and I'm $252 dollars lighter! That's a plus, right? Just looking for the bright side here. I all ready know what it is, I could have been 200 miles from home rather than 20, and the repair could have been something WAY more expensive! I also learned that the bikes tool kit does not have nearly enough of the right tools and bits to do much of anything; also need to upgrade from basic aaa roadside assistance. That won't get your bike towed, the aaa rv service does and will take you up to 100 miles rather than 7. Thankfully my riding buddy has the upgraded card. Thanks Jim!
     
  12. CandyRedRC46

    CandyRedRC46 Member

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    I am with you on the "I suggest that you inspect and clean the bike's connections and switches as part of your scheduled maintenance."
     
  13. V4toTour

    V4toTour New Member

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    Two options:

    1. The correct answer, cut out connector between stator and R/R. Solder and heatshrink.

    2. If you want to retain connectors, clean out dielectric grease. Use Ox-Gard instead. Ox-Gard is a corrosion inhibitor, but it also is a conductor. It will fill the voids between the spade terminals and actually decrease resistance improving conductivity. Since it is conductive, you want to use it sparingly. Big globs of it spilling over between connectors will cause shorts.
     
  14. NormK

    NormK New Member

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    John I agree there is a butt load of connectors on these bikes but it is always the same ones around the charging system that cause the most grief
     
  15. karazy

    karazy New Member

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    I use it on all my bikes and have never had a problem. All my connectors are looking shiny and new, with no electrical problems.

    As a long time aircraft tech, I can assure you that if it was not safe, we would not be using it on a daily basis to maintain aircraft.

    Just don't put it under lugs, or your battery posts, before making the connection.

    Ox-guard is a clear thin liquid, that is nearly impossible to control. It works well when used in the correct situation, but probably not this one.

    Once a spade connector is corroded, it is usually too late to try to clean. So it is better to try to prevent it first.

    If you're still not convinced, you can use a non-corrosive protectent, such as LPS2. It just won't last as long.
     
  16. bintings

    bintings New Member

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    Hey guys


    Thanks for all the input.

    I understand that cutting out the connectors would be the best option (and probably one that I will do in the event of another problem) although with my limited yet growing knowledge of electrics I opted for the vfrness.
    All the connectors were new and shiny and I made sure to only put grease on these new connectors (not inside).

    Definitely learnt my lesson about leaving burnt connecters in and riding, I've literally been checking and testing voltages after every ride since the upgrade.

    I read into Ox-gard but opted for dielectric grease only because everything was already in place, soldered and connected and thought it wouldn't be much use from the outside.

    All in all I think I will leave d' grease (which is lightly coated at the wire ends of the connectors) with regular checks and maintenance. In my understanding: because the pins/wires are new there should be minimal resistance therefore minimal heat. Only riding every-so often in winter, I see it as a larger benefit to keep moisture out then a small buildup of heat.
     
  17. RVFR

    RVFR Member

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    Dang what a thread. Love it when this much info is thrown out all good stuff. Me being one that works in the domestic water pump field and I'm a so called electrical control specialist, has it I see a lot if this corrosion connection, 90% is from just being ignored lack of if taking a peek is maintenance. yes d-gearse is cool I use it here and there . just don't use a lot, just a smear works, same with ox gard sparingly is key. But what works for me and since it's good on 480/240 volt 3 phase a simple 12v load shouldn't be a problem, and so far it worked, this stuff works great just saying Two things, pay attention and keep things clean. http://wd40specialist.com/products/corrosion-inhibitor/ Yes good ole WD 40. I tell ya, one only needs duct tape a swiss army knife and wd 40. life is good.
     
  18. V4toTour

    V4toTour New Member

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    Ox-Gard has the consistency of anti sieze and is most certainly not clear. It's silverish in color due to powdered zinc and graphite. it's not meant to be slathered all over connectors. It's designed to create a flim between the mating surfaces of conductors. It fills in voids and imperfections between surfaces improving conductivity. Slopping di-electric grease inside a connector WILL NOT improve the connection. In fact to get conductivity the connector needs to be able to scrape the grease out of the way and will only conduct at those contact points. Ox-Gard is especially useful when using disimilar metals and between aluminum connectors in general. So if you're installing new crimp connections it helps immensely to dip the wire ends in a bit of Ox-Gard before crimping on.

    Dielectric grease is only good for keeping out moisture. For example, in the marine environment I would use a coat of Ox-Gard between connectors and a terminal block. THEN apply dielectric grease over the entire terminal.

    So for motorcycle usage, with a clean spade connector. Apply a small bead of ox-gard inside the female connector. Snap connector together, and then pack in a bit of dielectric grease behind the terminals.
     
  19. rjgti

    rjgti New Member

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    yupper v4 ^^^^
     
  20. karazy

    karazy New Member

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    Ah, a conductive grease. I've seen it used on turret slip rings, where shorts aren't a problem. Not for use on multi-pin connectors, but everything else should be fair game. We use something with a similar name, but totally different item, used on PCBs, where conformal coating can't be used.

    Cheers
     
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