A few things I've learned in the last month.

Discussion in 'New Riders' started by Gnarlymutt, Jun 22, 2016.

  1. Gnarlymutt

    Gnarlymutt New Member

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    I've owned my 97 VFR750 (offically named Scarlett since she's a redhead) for about a month now, and here are a few observations that I've noticed in that time.

    1. There is just something about the way she sounds when the engine is revved. I have a hard time seeing it ever get old.
    2. I've been caught off guard at how much my hands feel like they fall asleep after about 20 minutes of riding. Constantly shaking them out to get the blood flowing again.
    3. Riding in strong wind can be scary. It was so bad the other night that I felt very unstable.
    4. Take the MSF class. I am constantly reverting back to it's teachings while I ride. Money and time well spent.
    5. There's nothing wrong with your bike when it dies after putting it in to gear, no matter how many times you have to restart it. Just put your side-stand up, dummy.
    6. It doesn't matter how long you have been riding, you're automatically part of the 2-Wheeled Fraternity. The biking community is so much friendlier than the rest of the general population.
    7. Fogged/smudged visors are hell when riding the highway at night.
    8. I love my VFR. To quote Ferris Bueller: "It is so choice. If you have the means, I highly recommend picking one up."
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2016
  2. Knight

    Knight New Member

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    Something I do when programming for hours or when trying to revive the hands while riding, and that is an isometric: press your left and right palms together hard, and roll your shoulders while doing it. This provides a brief relaxation for the entire arm and can get blood flowing. I find sometimes that the hands come back to life immediately after doing this.

    Another one is, at the stoplight, twist 180°, grab the passenger handle, and gently stretch.

    Wow A+, absolutely these folks are. Hrm, if bikers are friendlier, then we should put all of humanity through the MSF as a mandatory course! Which would be good to get their awareness up as well.

    This one remains a killer for me! I like the one member's solution of adding a breathing snorkel to the helmet. That seems the only way to avoid this, by controlling the flow of the breath.
     
  3. Old-Novice

    Old-Novice New Member

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    "1. There is just something about the way she sounds when the engine is revved. I have a hard time seeing it ever get old."

    Apparently, they don't have to. Check out my ride. Good blog. Bruce
     
  4. Lint

    Lint Member

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    One word. Pinlock.
     
  5. Lint

    Lint Member

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    Numbers 2 & 3 are most likely because you aren't holding your upper body up with your knees and core, but rather leaning forward and putting all of that pressure on your wrists.
    Get some tank grip and lightly squeeze your tank and use your body to keep light pressure on your arms and hands. The reason strong wind is affecting you is that you are too heavy on the bars and therefore transferring too much motion to your bike.
    Take the pressure off and you'll find your bike naturally will help you due to centrifugal motion in the wheels. I've ridden in 40 mph side wind before and this really helped. Heavy pressure on the bars equals gross movements. Light pressure on the bars allows small corrections and lose comfortable wrists.
     
  6. mofo

    mofo New Member

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    #2. You are gripping the throttle too tight. AKA, the grip of death.
    Relax your wrists and shoulders, find a better angle to rest the palm of your hand.
     
  7. A.M

    A.M Moderator Staff Member

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    This is awesome to read! Thank you! I hope you always enjoy your moto!

    #1. That's one reason I'll ride motos no matter how old I get.

    #3. It is scary...at first. Once you realize you won't really get knocked off the road, it gets better. I've been knocked around in huge approaching cold fronts, spent 3 hours in crazy cross winds once that left a strip of asphalt on the edge of my tires...also ripped off license plate and the left side of my face felt like it had been hit be a truck for a week, and ride in Kansas wind all the time. As long as you don't have death grip, the moto will sway under you. You will get knocked around the lanes at times, but try different things...put a knee out, put pressure on a foot peg or side of the tank, lean your body a certain way, tuck in...just don't have death grip. Once you are able to get used to it, and the feel of the wind, and your mind is eased, riding in the wind can be fun. It can be relaxing. I was dozing off on my last trip...swaying in the wind was so relaxing. I had to pull over I was getting so sleepy.

    #6. The biking community is super! Even HD riders, heck, I've even experienced rude and uppity sport bike riders. Some will pretend you don't exist, but if you are in need, I believe most of them would come to aid.
     
  8. duccmann

    duccmann Member

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  9. RobVG

    RobVG Member

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    For tired neck, back, and hands...

    Get a throttle lock, lock it, take your left hand off the grip and put it on the clutch res. Lay down on the tank and rest your chin on a tank bag. Just don't fall asleep like I did....
     
  10. A.M

    A.M Moderator Staff Member

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    Haha...it's sooooo easy to fall asleep on moto, especially on a pleasantly warm day with head on tank bag.

    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
     
  11. Jeff_Barrett

    Jeff_Barrett Member

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    Especially the way you stretch out on the rear pegs ... lol ... I do it too, but my legs aren't nearly as stretched out.
     
  12. duccmann

    duccmann Member

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    Really Rob, you fell asleep? We have ta hear this one....
     
  13. RobVG

    RobVG Member

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    I mentioned it one time ducc. Went up for a ride with our illustrious neighbor to the north. It was a long day. Got lost on the way back. Didn't cross the border till 12:30 am. Assumed the aforementioned position and fell asleep at 75 on I-5 in Mount Vernon. Rudely awakened by a line of road tits.
     
  14. duccmann

    duccmann Member

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    Thank GOD FOR TITS
     
  15. Allyance

    Allyance Insider

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    Back in mid-seventies, almost fell aslept on my Kaw Z1 900! Hot day on the NYS Thruway, had to pull off at service center and took an hour nap on the grass! No tits!
     
  16. duccmann

    duccmann Member

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    Back in 85 on my 750 Inteceptor riding through Utarville, well over 12 hrs on this glorious day after leaving Laguna, of course not hydrating as we know it now, think we drank beer to hydrate...but any whooooo.... was takin
    No Dose
    (No Blow left)and wicking it up to 120 ta get the blood pumping to stat awake. ...haven't thought about those days in a while....surprised I survived.
     
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