1986 VFR 700F Interceptor Carb Rebuild, Cleaning, Parts----whose got, and who does what....????

Discussion in '1st & 2nd Generation 1983-1989' started by ElectricRider, Jan 25, 2013.

  1. ElectricRider

    ElectricRider New Member

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    Hello there my fellow Interceptor riders. I have recently gone to great lengths to re-aquire a 2nd gen Interceptor 700. This VFR was badly neglected, so I am in the process of cleaning her up and restoring her to her old glory.

    Interestingly enough I've been running into a bit of a snafu' regarding parts for this beauty in the beast. I'm sure others have encountered this as well. I have searched these forums exstensively and found some really good tips and tricks for sorting much out and thank all previous posters for their efforts and time in trying to keep this once 3x world championship race bike still running.

    So, a little help here with the Carbs would be great. Where do I get rebuild kits from on the cheep. Who does a stellar job in rebuilding them. I've tried contacting a few of the people previously mentioned on here that do good work and to no avail. I'm speaking of Billy Car and Squirlman both. Anybody else out there still in this game? Hoping to here back from one of these cats but some words were said about someone getting ripped off and that is no bueno. Anyways, point me in the right direction please. Thanks for taking the time to look this over, and hopefully make this Carb rebuild thread a little more current......

    Other then that, ride safe, keep it up right, and the rubber side down!!!!! :crazy:
     
  2. TOE CUTTER

    TOE CUTTER Mullet Man

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  3. ElectricRider

    ElectricRider New Member

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    Thanks Toe Cutter, I've read that post before, great guide. Can you direct me to where and how to get these boots you speak of on the cheep....I'm going to take the carbs off after I finnish painting the fairings....Another VFR owner told me a good way to clean these carbs out is with a product napa sells by the gallon. Not sure of the name of it off hand but basickly he said to just dip them in it over night ....I was thinking about trying it.....I was also thinking about following your cleaning guide....haven't decided on what to do yet without having them off to look at.

    Anyhow, where do I get parts on the cheep from for these babies.....
     
  4. TOE CUTTER

    TOE CUTTER Mullet Man

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  5. fatso1277

    fatso1277 New Member

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    i would suggest following toecutters carb cleaning tutorial. makes things a lot easier. and really depending on how bad the carbs are might not need that much money. you can get the bowl gaskets on the low from motion industries. motionindustries.com Viton 3" X 1/16 or 75mm x 2mm or -041, some carb clearner and some wire strands. you should be able to clean the required parts. depending on how bad they are of course. Might save time and money..just make sure they dont leak before you put them back on...im a complete novice to bike mechanics and i followed it and it was easy.
     
  6. ElectricRider

    ElectricRider New Member

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    please show me a direct link to the part, unable to locate.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2013
  7. ElectricRider

    ElectricRider New Member

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    Heya Fatso, thanks for the direction on the gaskets however after going to that site and searching with those peramiters you gave I got a total of 7,500 pages that little part might be on......ugh!!!!
    Do you have a direct link to the part you could post on here? Thank you very much....
     
  8. ElectricRider

    ElectricRider New Member

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    This is what I'm getting look at 1st result it shows the viton part you described but no photo or price.....I'm providing a link to see if you can varify this is it
    https://www.motionindustries.com/motion3/jsp/mii/productSearch.jsp ok when you click on this or copy and post in new browser it goes to a dead page.....

    ok after an hour I found them
    they are listed under viton 041
    which ones
    do I want there are only 14 pages to chose from and many different types
    part# would be fantastic.....thanks.....
     
  9. squirrelman

    squirrelman Member

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    Some VFRistas don't have the time to open up carbs and fool with things they've never seen before. Carbs are brittle and very fragile, easily damaged; over-tightening could ruin things; drop them on a hard floor, they may be ruined. Not the best job for any beginner, no matter what. Often takes 4 or 5 efforts for a freshman to fix, time wasted for a busy professional who could be spending family time or on his or her computer or i-device rather than getting his or her hands dirty.

    Better to have a SPECIALIST PROFESSIONAL--Hello, it's Squirrelman to the carb rescue !!-- do a thorough inspection, cleaning, adjusting and testing; and with over 45 years carb experience (but still humble !!!), needing a bit of extra income to suppliment the SS, and with a quick turnaround and very reasonable rate, about $85 less than the other guy or your local dealer, you should call me TODAY or whenever @ 716 836-0154 to discuss your VFR carbulation issues with a real perfessional, Jerry.:wink:


    In simple, practical terms, my present rate to fix your carbs is $155 +return shipping. Any parts needed are extra at cost. (Usually no new parts needed.)




    OK, i'm unemployed and have nothing except YOUR carbs to keep me active, so have mercy, please.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2013
  10. hopit88

    hopit88 New Member

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    Here's a nice DIY guide. Super easy to follow anyone can do it. Billy C is THE man for V4 carbs, nice guy that doesn't have to beg for money. You can do these yourself but if you must send them out, I wouldn't send them anywhere else, but thats just me. I know of several guys with high end V4 builds that would only let him touch theiir carbs. He gets busy after March 1st so now is a good time. He also is happy to sell you a rebuild kit to DIY.
    Should be able to catch him here...Welcome to V4 Market - The Store For Your V4


    When you factor in the following new parts he installs plus free return shipping...it's a steal.
    Complete disassembly
    All metal parts cleaned in sweep frequency ultrasonic cleaner
    Float bowls and intake plenum are bead blasted
    Every component is inspected for damage and wear
    Each carb is outfitted with new Japanese made float valve assy's
    All seals are replaced with new Buna-N nitrile seals
    Pilot screws are preset to factory specs
    All throttle plates and choke pistons are bench synched for an easy startup
    All hardware is replaced with stainless steel socket head cap screws, nuts, washers and hitch pins
    Comes with new coolant tube seals, do this while your carbs are out of the bike

    DO NOT remove the aluminum plate that holds the 4 carbs together. You can do a pretty good job of cleaning without separating the carbs. The guide shows them completely apart but you don't have to get that crazy. When Billy does them, everything does get broken down.



    From V4BBS, for quick reference...
    "The V4 engines use 4 constant velocity (variable venturi) carburetors to supply fuel to the engine. The constant velocity refers to the air speed through the throat of the carb. The velocity is controlled by a slide mounted to a diaphram. The diaphram is sensitive to vacuum created by the flow of air across a hole(s) in the needle end of the slide. As the engine speed increases, the vacuum above the diaphram increases due to venturi action and the slide is raised.

    There are three circuits (paths) in the carb.
    The starting circuit (choke) provides extra fuel when the choke is open. It uses a fixed jet and a choke plunger to control the flow of fuel to the port in the carb throat. The restriction is the fixed jet at about 0.021 inches. The choke plunger also provides an air bypass around the throttle plate to increase the engine speed during warm up.

    The low speed circuit provides the primary fuel for operation below 4000 to 5000 rpm. When the engine is pulling vacuum the fuel is drawn through a passage to the low speed needle valve, and then to a large hole on the bowl side of the throat on the engine side of the throttle plate. The needle valve controls flow to the large hole. This path also feeds the 4 tiny holes on the float side of the throat and under the throttle plate. Both paths continue to function at all engine speeds. The restriction is the low speed needle or the low speed jet.

    The high speed circuit provides fuel above 4000 rpm. It uses a fixed orifice and a needle connected to the slide to control the flow of fuel to the needle valve opening in the carb throat. As engine speed increases the slide raises the needle and allows additional fuel to flow. The restriction is the needle valve on the slide. Since the needle valve never completely closes, the circuit provides fuel at all engine speeds.

    It should be verified that fuel is getting to the carbs. Verify you are getting a flow of fuel at the inlet hose to the carbs. No flow can be caused by delivery problems due to tank venting, plugged screen in the tank, pinched hoses, fuel pump problems or fuel filter plugged. Or you could be out of gas.

    The main symptoms of carb trouble are.
    1. Hard cold starting that is caused by restricted choke circuit, low speed circuit or improper fuel level in the float bowl. Failure modes that cause this are.
    a. Plugged low speed jet. The jet must be removed and cleaned.
    b. Plugged choke jet. The jet cannot be removed, it must be cleaned in place.
    c. Plugged low speed circuit and choke circuit passages from the jet to the carb throat. The carburetor must be removed and the passages cleaned.
    d. Improper fuel level in the float bowl. The float valve and screen must be removed and cleaned. The float must then be set to the correct level.
    e. Improper setting of the low speed needle valves. In most cases resetting them to the factory recommendation will be satisfactory.

    2. Poor idling and hesitation when accelerating up to 4000 rpm caused by restricted low speed circuits or improper fuel level in the float bowl. . Failure modes that cause this are.
    a. Plugged low speed jet. The jet must be removed and cleaned.
    b. Plugged low speed circuit passages from the jet to the carb throat. The carburetor must be removed and the passages cleaned.
    c. Improper fuel level in the float bowl. The float valve and screen must be removed and cleaned. The float must then be set to the correct level.
    d. Improper synchronization of the 4 carburetors. They may synced while on the engine using vacuum gages or mercury sticks.
    f. Improper setting of the low speed needle valves. In most cases resetting them to the factory recommendation will be satisfactory.

    3. Poor operation above 4000 rpm caused by improper slide operation or improper fuel level in the float bowl. Failure modes that cause this are.
    a. Ripped diaphram. Ripped diaphrams must be replaced, usually with the carbs off the bike.
    b. Leaking diaphram. If the diaphram is not seated correctly in the cover it will leak air and defeat the vacuum action.
    c. Sticking slide. The slide must be removed and any contamination removed.
    d. Choke valve not closing completely.
    e. Incorrect high speed jet or emulsion tube installed. Verify correct parts.
    f. Incorrect spring installed over the slide. Verify correct springs.
    g. Incorrect high speed needle installed. Verify correct needle.


    Carburetor Cleaning and Rebuild

    There are 3 approaches to cleaning the carbs.
    Use an additive in the gas tank such as Techtron or Sea Foam.
    Do the disassembly and cleaning yourself.
    Send them to a professional for a super cleaning.
    The additive route sometimes works if the plugging of circuits is not too bad.
    The do it yourself method will achieve well functioning carburetors that looks like they did when you took it off.
    The professional cleaning by Billy Carr will make them shine and function like new with the added advantage that he has any needed replacement parts. BBS friendly carb cleaning service

    To quote Billy, being the local carb guy means I get mine either way. I rebuild them... I get paid. You do them yourself with my cheap carb kit ... I get paid. Buy the carb kit and in a few hours and you can have a resealed long lasting set of carbs. Never be afraid to delve in to a set of carbs unless you do not possess the simple ability to tell which end of a combination wrench is which. Worst case scenario is you mail me a bucket full of parts when you realize you got in over your head. Saves me teardown time.

    Sample of his work.

    [​IMG]



    Helpful hints if you do them yourself.

    Take photos of the carbs installed, cable routing, removed still on the plenum from all angles. You will treasure them when you put things back together.
    Remove all 4 carburetors and the plenum (air box) as an assembly.
    Drain the fuel from each carb through the drain nipple by opening the needle screw in the bottom of the float bowl.
    If the carb rack (all 4 carbs bolted to the plenum) is dirty clean it with a degreaser before you start to take things apart.

    [​IMG]



    When you disassemble your carbs keep the parts separated by individual carb as they are different from front to rear in many cases (baby food jars are great). Note, after 30 years and many owners the parts may not actually be in the correct location. Always refer to manual for the correct placement and part. The model number will be stamped on the flange above the float bowl.
    Do not be afraid to use a permanent marker in an out of the way spot to keep the carbs straight (number the baby food jars too). They are numbered #1- #4 left to right as you sit on the bike.
    If you do not split the rack you will not have to hassle with the linkages and the throttle plate synch will be much easier. You will not be able to change the fuel and air tube o-rings however, your call.
    Use a good #3 Philips tip screw driver bit or impact bit to loosen all screws. Tap each one a couple of times with a hammer and bit before you try to loosen them
    Your work area should someplace where you can track down parts that may escape you.

    Do It Yourself Rebuild

    Buy a carb rebuild kit from Billy C at BBS friendly carb cleaning service
    It has everything you need plus a DVD filled with information.


    These are the parts you will be dealing with in total, not necessarily contained in the kit.

    [​IMG]



    One carb at a time, remove the 4 screws that hold the float bowl on. Check condition of the o-ring seal. If hardened, get new ones. If they have never been replaced they will be hard and flat.

    [​IMG]


    Remove and clean the drain plug and clean the drain nipple if plugged.
    Remove the pin holding the float in place, remove the float and needle.
    Remove and check the condition of the needle seat and screen.
    Remove the high speed jet and holder (emulsion tube). Make sure all holes are clean.
    Remove the low speed jet. Make sure all holes are clean especially the one through the center, clean with a 0.015 inch wire or #79 pin drill for 38 size jets. The size of the jet is stamped on it. 38 stands for 0.38 mm or about 0.15 inches.
    The choke jet cannot be removed, pressed in. Clean the hole through the center of it, clean with an 0.021 inch wire or a #75 pin drill.
    Inspect all passages and blow air or a solvent through them. Look into each hole with a good light and a magnifying glass.

    Login 20pc Drill Bits #61-80 and Pin Vise

    [​IMG]



    Remove the low speed needle from the side of the carb just above the float joint. It may be covered with an aluminum cap to prevent tampering. If it is, drill a 1/8 inch hole in the cap, drive in a sheet metal screw a couple of threads and pull the cap out. Before unscrewing the needle, turn it in counting the number of rotations until it seats lightly. The needle will have a spring, flat washer and o-ring behind it, remove them.
    Inspect all passages with a good light and a magnifying glass and blow air or a solvent through them.

    [​IMG]




    Remove the choke valve by removing the black plastic nut, the linkage plate, the black linkage sleeve and spring. Work it out as an assembly. Be careful, the black nut is fragile.
    Take some more pictures of where all the linkage goes.

    [​IMG]


    Blow air through all the passages to clean, including the choke jet.

    On the other side of the carb, remove 4 screws holding on the chrome cover. Be alert, it is spring loaded.
    Remove the diaphram cover and spring.
    Remove the diaphram slide assembly. Carefully inspect the diaphram for any tears or cracks. If any found, big and expensive problem to replace. Clean the slide and its bore of any residue. Don't use carb cleaner on the diaphrams, it will damage them. Use a 0.018 inch wire or pin drill #77 to clean the brass orifice located under the diaphram cover. This orifice appears to be a drain for any fuel accumulated in the top of the diaphram.

    With all the jets, needles, slides and chokes removed, blow air through all the passages including the choke jet. Blow air through the small ports in the carb throat to verify that they are clear. Soaking in a cleaner may now be done safely.

    [​IMG]



    Now is the time to replace the o rings on the fuel rail if you plan on doing it. Be very careful with the tubes as they can be broken with sideways pressure. The o rings are included in the Billy C kit.
    Use a quality #3 Philips head screw driver to loosen the 8 screws holding the carbs to the plenum. Tap them with a bit and hammer to break them loose. Leave all screws in place until they all have been broken loose.
    Take pictures of all the springs on the throttle linkage.
    Remove the 8 screws and remove the plenum. There are locator dowels on each carb that may require prying out for separation. BE CAREFUL the sync and shaft springs will fall out when you separate the carbs. You did take those pictures right? The tubes are unique so keep track of what goes where.
    Remove the o rings from the tubes and replace with the new ones.
    Clean the holes that the tubes insert into. Did you notice that the fuel path runs straight through the bottom of all 4 carbs?
    Carefully insert the fuel tubes back into the carb bodies along with the vent tubes if your model has them. Do not let the o ring roll out of the groove. The throttle adjuster plates and shaft springs must also be lined up for each carb. Do not worry about the sync springs at this point.
    Replace the plenum with new socket head cap screws M6-1.00 x 20. You do not want to mess with the Philips the next time. They are available at most hardware stores for about $.50 each. Evenly tighten the screws making sure that the tubes and shafts are not binding. Boiling the air funnels makes them easier to install. Old ones shrink and are a pain in the ass to get in place. Make sure the line on the funnel is between the two index lines on the airbox.

    When you are satisfied that everything is clean, begin reassembly.

    Assemble the diaphram slide assembly into the carb, make sure the hole(s) in the diaphram align with the holes in the carb.
    Assemble the spring and cover. Short vacuum piston springs install in the rear carbs, long springs install in the front carbs. Make sure the diaphram seats into the groove. Tighten 4 screws. To test seating, hook a shop vac up to the engine side of the carb and open the throttle plate. The slide should rise, then fall when the throttle is closed. If it doesn't the diaphram is not seated.

    [​IMG]



    Gently flex the floats to check for cracks. They like to crack where the lattice meets the float---and then they fill up with gas. You'll notice the float full of fuel if you tear down quick after carb removal. Otherwise you won't know without careful inspection.

    Inspect your float needles. The rubber tip on can pull out of the metal needle and bind up the valve.

    Carefully clean the choke plungers. It makes them operate smoother and prevents them from hanging up. Some fine emery paper works well for this. Inspect the end of the choke valve for the condition of the rubber insert. If it is badly worn in may be removed and flipped over. Replacements are not available.
    Assemble the high and low speed jets in the carb tightly. Verify the correct size is used in the correct location. The fuel emulsion tubes that the main jets thread into are different between front and rear carbs. There are low drilled holes and high drilled holes in the tubes. The tubes with the holes located furthest away from the main jet install in the rear carbs.
    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]



    Set the float height by holding the carb on its side until the float just stops closing. Then measure the distance from the top of the float to the bowl surface. If you lay the carb down it will distort the reading. Adjust the height by bending the metal tab on the float. A dial or digital caliper back end works well for setting the height. If you get different readings on each side of the float, use an average of the two readings.
    Install the float bowl with gasket and 4 screws tightly. Tighten the drain plug in the bowl.

    Assemble the spring, washer and o-ring in that order on the slow speed needle. Screw in the needle assembly until it just bottoms out. Then open the number of full turns recommended.

    [​IMG]



    Assemble the choke valves, lifter arm, spring, black sleeve, black nut and linkage plate. Don't break the plastic nut. Test by moving the choke lever (where the cable attached) and verifying that the valve opens about 3/8" and closes with a slight clearance between the head of the valve and the fork. You may need to wait to do this until all 4 valves are assembled. If they don't function correctly, adjust the linkage by bending.

    Install all sync springs at this time. Remember there is a spring on the sync screw and a spring between the two tabs. Use those pictures you took for reference.

    [​IMG]




    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]



    Bench check the sync of the carbs.
    #1 carb is adjusted with the black idle knob. Place a 1/8 inch wide strip of printer paper between the throttle plate and bore on # 1 carb. Adjust the black idle knob until there is a slight drag on the paper.
    Next, place a strip into #3 carb. Adjust the screw on the linkage for the same drag. There must be 2 springs on the adjuster for it to work properly. One on the screw, one in the linkage.
    Verify that the linkage between the front and rear carbs is in place and that the bushing are tight.
    Next, place a strip into #2 carb. Adjust the screw on the linkage for the same drag. There must be 2 springs on the adjuster for it to work properly. One on the screw, one in the linkage.
    Next, place a strip into #4 carb. Adjust the screw on the linkage for the same drag. There must be 2 springs on the adjuster for it to work properly. One on the screw, one in the linkage.

    An alternative method uses the small hole in the carb throat to set the plates. The plates should be set so that half the hole is visible. The hole is opposite the paper shown in carb #1.

    [​IMG]



    Cycle the throttles to make sure the settings repeat.

    With the carbs mounted to the plenum do the following before you put them on the engine
    1. Do a bench sync and make sure all the little springs are in the throttle linkage. Make sure that the linkage bushings are not worn out, this can cause sync problems. All 4 throttle plates should move at the same time.
    2. Move the choke lever and verify that all 4 choke valves are opening and closing fully. Adjust (bend) linkage to get them all working and have clearance at the valve to fork when closed.
    3. Hook up a shop vacuum to the engine side of each carb. Open the throttle with the vacuum running. The slide should open, and close quickly when the throttle is closed.
    4. Some people fill the carbs with fuel before installing to make sure there are no leaks.

    Now is the best time to change the o-rings on the 2 coolant tubes in the V of the engine. It can be done with the carbs in, but not easily.
    After reinstalling the carbs on the bike and before you hook up the fuel line, FLUSH the fuel lines to remove any debris. Or you may be doing this procedure again.

    After reinstalling the carbs on the bike a sync of the carbs should be done using gages. This will compensate for the minor differences in flow to each cylinder. With a good bench sync, most people find that there will not be much change needed. Do this sync in the same 1,3,2,4 order.

    The manuals describe an idle drop method to adjust the low speed needles. It is somewhat difficult to do and the results people have had are varied. Give it a try if you want, but most people get back to just about the recommended settings. I prefer to start with the recommended and then close each needle a quarter turn in. Ride the bike and verify that acceleration has not been affected. Try an additional quarter turn and verify acceleration. If performance falls off, go back one step. This leaning of the mixture procedure will improve your mileage and improve hot starting in high temperature conditions."
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2013
  11. ElectricRider

    ElectricRider New Member

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    KHV-17026 Float Valve Needle and Seat | Motorcycle Spares Warehouse

    After much searching I've found a replacement for the float needles....KHV-17026 Float Valve Needle and Seat.....
    Replacement for Honda: 16011-MM4-004, 16011-422-004, 16011-MM5-671

    CBX1000 A / B / C / Z 1978-1982

    CBR1000 SC21 1987-1988

    CBR600 F RC21 1987-1989

    VF500 F 1986

    VFR 700 1986-87

    VFR750F 1986-87
     
  12. ElectricRider

    ElectricRider New Member

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    Orings
    041 BUNA-N 90 DURO O-RING
    041, 70 Durometer 1 Each O-Ring
    Item No. 00622101

    this looks to be them from motionpro, now the question is how to get shipping cheeper then 9.95$ for a couple orings, lol, guess ill give them a call.
     
  13. coffee_brake

    coffee_brake New Member

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    My VFR700 was in the same neglected state when I brought it back to life. I took lots and lots and LOTS of photos of everything I touched because I had to remove mine from the aluminum plenum and break them apart from the rack to replace the fuel rail o-rings. And, I had to go all the way through the choke passages too. Be really careful if you need to remove the choke plungers (and it sounds like you will need to do this if your bike has been neglected half as much as mine was). It is very easy to break the narrow brass neck in them. There's a lot to take apart but the photos will help you get it back together.
    And, I got a set of parts carbs with one broken body so there's a few extra hard parts I can offer. Of course you won't be using used rubber parts.

    Yes you can do this. What complexity is added to the V-4 carbs in their linkages, is negated by their ease of installation and removal. Take heart, it's a Honda!
     
  14. fatso1277

    fatso1277 New Member

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    Hey Electricrider, i have a motion industries by my house, i can pick them up for you and send them and the float needles to you. i have a parts carbs at home. sorry i didnt mention it earlier but i completely forgot about it. Sorry..blame it on the alco, alco, alcohol. LOL. i dont know what state the float needles are in...but i can send them to you...im trying to find the exact o-ring to order. its -041 but is a certain length x width.

    i know the orings come in a 3 pack, so you gotta buy 6 total, but the cost is minimal..under $10 if i remember correctly
     
  15. JamieDaugherty

    JamieDaugherty New Member

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    Billy Carr from the V4HondaBBS is the man when it comes to carbs, nobody does it better. His contact info is:

    Email - billycarrjr@earthlink.net
    Phone # 903-567-1543

    Billy Carr
    20706 State Highway 19
    Canton, TX 75103-5751
     
  16. squirrelman

    squirrelman Member

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    I believe from reading earlier threads that many had problems getting things done in any reasonable time from Mr. Billy, some waiting weeks, not communicating well with his customers, too much work causing slowdowns. That's what i read on VFRW.

    Maybe Mr. Billy's the Texas Superstar celebrity (Hobbit 88 may have wedding plans?) some riders who won't work in thier carbs want him to be, but lots of well-experienced gents (mostly Golden Agers) can fiddle carbs just as well, faster and cheaper in fact. With the detailed instructions provided, seems a mystery why someone with decent tools, factory service manual and time to spare wouldn't dive in on his own, relegating us both to history's dustbin. On the other hand, sometimes only pros can fix it best. I don't enjoy working on carbs for money, just to keep my restlesss hands busy and my need to touch small parts.

    The unproved opinion that nobody does it better than Texas Billy doesn't rule out anyone from doing just as well, do it ?? If someone turned out the same quality work with a quicker turnaround, wouldn't that be better ? Don't need no Merlin magicians, just someone with the experience to do it right the first time, every time and spend the time it takes to do it right. Anyone can install socket-head capscrews !
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2013
  17. hopit88

    hopit88 New Member

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    Jamie's "unproved opinion" carries as much weight as the "same quality" assertion which is itself unproven and likely wishful thinking. But even if it were true, for me, like with anything I spend my hard earned money on, it boils down to who is deserving of my green and in this case it's a no-brainer.
     
  18. ThatVF500Guy

    ThatVF500Guy New Member

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    For O-rings, fasteners and such it's hard to beat mcmaster carr. Their shipping is reasonable too.
    McMaster-Carr

    Good luck,
    Jim
    BTW, I see you are from T.O. I grew up there in the 70's .
     
  19. Dukiedook

    Dukiedook New Member

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    GET the Viton o-rings if you plan on using gasahol petrol which is pretty much what they only sell these days. Just call up your local oring shop and they should be able to help you find what you need.
     
  20. crazyjimmy

    crazyjimmy New Member

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    Great Tutorial. Thanks!
     
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